Repair and Renewal: Making Things Whole Again

 Blood-Water Pollution   2015             Constructed from recycled tin cans.                                                 20" x 20" x 3"                                                                                    Photo Credit: Philip Cohen

 Blood-Water Pollution   2015             Constructed from recycled tin cans.                                                 20" x 20" x 3"                                                                                    Photo Credit: Philip Cohen

Artists statement for Repair Renewal 

The themes of “repair the world” are fundamental in all of my work.  “Blood – Water Pollution” is portrayed as a modern version of the first biblical plague, blood.  All of the materials for this sculpture are removed from a waste stream of our society and repurposed as a metaphorical artwork about our collective responsibility to heal the earth.  Humans have caused pollution, but we can choose to prevent pollution and repair the environmental damage.

We have made strides in awareness and in cleaning up our rivers, oceans and underground water resources.  Some pollution has been intentional, such as the chemical dumping revealed by consumer advocate Erin Brockovich,  but most pollution is unintentional, such as the Flint, Michigan situation or agricultural pesticide runoff into rivers, or the huge plastic gyres in our oceans.

As a society, we need to maintain our vigilance and become even more aware of the ultimate consequences of our current consumption, waste and contaminants that can lead to detrimental environmental impact.  



“Blood – Water Pollution” is part of a new series titled, “The 10 Modern Plagues” which interprets a range of global crises caused by current human activity as analogous to the ten biblical plagues. 

 

Side view of Blood - Water Pollution and the Need to Provide Clean Affordable Water by Harriete Estel Berman from recycled tin cans.
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This page is specifically constructed for the application to Exhibition in Print 2017 curated by Guest Curator, Stuart Kestenbaum.
If you arrive on this page you will not be able to get back without the link for this page. 

The 10 Modern Plagues can be found here.